Gluten-free Oreo Truffles

Merry Christmas readers! (If you celebrate of course.)

In my family, nothing says the holidays like Christmas cookies. In fact, last night, one of my cousins proclaimed that she wasn’t going to eat much dinner because she was saving all her room for cookies. “I look forward to them all year!”

I, too, once had a slightly worrisome obsession with Christmas cookies. You see, every year at this time, I’m surrounded. My aunt makes dozens and dozens of 6-7 different types. A few other family members also partake in the baking, and then there’s my grandma. She makes so many, they fill an entire 6-foot tall freezer! There’s bird’s nets, peanut butter blossoms, oatmeal raisin, chocolate chip, snowballs, sugar cookies, kookoo cookies (a chocolate cookie topped with a marshmallow, with a recipe to come on here soon!), a few more that I don’t recall the names of, and all on top of nut bread, cheese roll, and on and on….

Yup, all things I can no longer enjoy.

Upon arriving home this year, one of the first things my mother asked me was, “So you can’t have any cookies?” as if this news and blog were brand new information to her. Sometimes I think my family has taken it harder than I did! “Oh Natalie,” they start, oh-so solemnly, “that must be so difficult.

But then I think back to last year and remember my addictions. For starters, I could never have just one cookie. I’d eat one, which led to more than I can admit to or count (basically until I was ready to explode). Then the moment I wasn’t full anymore, I’d stuff my face some more. I think I dreamed of cookies, as the moment I woke up, I’d have several for breakfast. It was legit out of control. (No, I really don’t know how I didn’t weigh 200 lbs. Maybe the reason I didn’t lose weight like most people after giving up gluten is because I was one of the opposite types that lose weight when eating gluten with an intolerance. Who knows.) In any event, it’s no wonder that last year, after stuffing my face like a kid that just came home from fat camp, I was breaking out in rashes left and right and suffering severe stomachaches. It was last year during my annual trip home for the holidays that I decided to start the elimination diet that ultimately (in a long, roundabout way) concluded for me that gluten and I were no longer friends. So in a way, those cookies changed my life.

But of course, I’m not going to sit around feeling sorry for myself. I honestly never did mourn the loss of gluten because I was SO HAPPY to celebrate the gain of my life—no more migraines, no more stomachaches, no more rashes or acne, no more bloating and overall discomfort, no more fatigue, no more insomnia. Again, I say, no food (not even a cookie) is worth any one of those symptoms. Thus, resisting them this year has been surprisingly easy.

However, there was one thing I was worried about: Every year for the holidays, I make cookies for my co-workers. I started the tradition 8 Christmases ago, never expecting the type of reaction I got. People gushed over them, causing my list of recipients to grow longer each year. Truthfully, I love the joy the cookies bring because it reminds me of the joy my family’s cookies once brought me. I love making and gifting them. This year, I was worried they might not turn out as well, and the tradition would die. Unfortunately, I was also sick, so I didn’t have quite the energy to put into experimenting and making them awesome.

Cookies for co-workers

Cookies for co-workers

But one item on my sweets list was an absolute must for a gluten-free makeover—my Oreo truffles. You can find the recipe all over the Internet (I first grabbed it from Kraft magazine many years ago). It’s as SIMPLE as can be, involves three easy-to-find ingredients, but I swear to you, people will think you are God’s gift to chocolate for making them. One year, I opened the office fridge to find a note taped to someone’s goodie bag that threatened to hunt anyone down who took them. I’ve literally been chased down the hall for these bite-sized bundles of joy. In fact, I’m honestly afraid to post the recipe here for fear my friends will all realize how ridiculously easy these really are and I’ll burst their mirage of my baking skills!

But, in the spirit of Christmas and giving, I’ll share :) I’m happy to report that making these gluten-free went completely unnoticed by my co-workers. So many of them actually said to me, “I can’t believe you can’t eat these; so sad!” HA! That’s what I call a g-free baking success.

Gluten-free Oreo Truffles

Serves 30-35
Prep time 35 minutes
Allergy Egg, Fish, Peanuts, Shellfish, Soy, Tree Nuts, Wheat
Dietary Gluten Free, Vegetarian
Meal type Dessert
Misc Serve Cold

Ingredients

  • 1 box of approximately 30 gluten-free oreos (I highly recommend Trader Joe's Gluten-free Joe-Joe's. They taste just like the original oreos, which keep these truffles at their best.)
  • 6oz cream cheese
  • 8oz Baker's semi-sweet chocolate or semi-sweet chocolate chips

Directions

Step 1
Crush cookies in a food processor or blender until they form a fine powder. Place in a large bowl. I find it best to work with about 10 cookies at a time.
(Set aside about 3 tablespoons worth of cookie powder for later.)
Step 2
Bring cream cheese to room temperature, or place in the microwave for about 20 seconds. Mix together well with the cookie powder.
Gluten-free oreo truffle mix
Step 3
Melt semi-sweet chocolate in the microwave in 20 second increments until melted. Stir well.
Step 4
Scoop cookie mixture about a teaspoon at a time and roll into a ball. Dip each ball into the melted chocolate. (Over the years, I've found it best to do this with two forks, and then let the excess chocolate drip into the bowl.)
Gluten-free Oreo Truffles
Step 5
Sprinkle the top with the set-aside cookie crumbles.
Place on parchment paper (best so they don't stick to the plate) on a tray or plate and freeze or refrigerate for about an hour.
These are best served cold (I like them best out of the freezer, then thawed about 20 minutes).

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